Patagonia – Biggest Browns in the World?

Chasing Mammoth Brown Trout in Patagonia

The Rio Limay  is an important river in the northwestern Argentine Patagonia (part of Patagonia also lies in Chile).   but from the fly fisherman’s point of view, it’s importance lies in the fact that it is one of the most prolific producers of huge brown trout in the world.

Despite having ​ lost about 70km of its former 450 km length to dams and reservoirs, “the Limay is likely the most dependable place in northern Patagonia to chase and find trophy trout” and “No river anywhere in the world may hold more big brown trout”, according to a recent article published in Hatch Magazine.

This article, by S. Chris Hunt, appear recently in the publication.   If you enjoy this excerpt, you can find a link to the full article at the bottom of this extract.

​High Desert Monsters

Sometimes when we fish with friends, we foster an unspoken, cordial competition. You know, the “first fish, most fish, biggest fish” thing. Being successful at fly fishing means you’re likely doing something right—it’s a technical craft, for the most part, and doing it well is usually important to success.

It feels good when you’re doing everything right, when you’ve put together a diverse set of elements into a single successful act, and it’s nice to measure your good fortune against others, particularly if they’re solid anglers.

And success, of course, breeds confidence, which leads you to honestly believe that every cast and every drift or swing will result in the biggest fish of the trip.

Experience is Everything

On Patagonia’s sprawling high-desert Rio Limay, take all that crap and throw it out the window.

This is a river whose sheer size and volume leave so much to chance that, in most instances, it doesn’t matter one lick who’s on the business end of the fly rod.

What can pay dividends is being on the river with someone experienced enough to read such an immense torrent and put you on the right water for the fish you’re seeking.

For the Limay’s massive brown trout, it’s absolutely vital to get a fly—usually a gaudy articulated streamer that wiggles seductively in the river’s varied currents—to the bottom and to the bottom as fast as you can.

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